Italy: Seventy Years of Human Rights

 

By Stefania Ciacciarelli, UPF Italy

In Monza, year after year, the appointment with human rights is renewed on December 10th, thanks to the initiatives promoted by the UPF – Universal Peace Federation and the commitment of the president of the association’s Monza chapter, Mr. Carlo Chierico, on the occasion of the anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights signed at the UN in 1948 and which this year put out 70 candles.

The journalist Carlotta Morgana was the host of this year’s conference – entitled “Human rights: focus on Burma, Syria, Togo” together with Carlo Chierico who introduced the evening with this thought: “When politics ceases to deal with the people must be civil society to take the field for the defense of rights “; a reference to the words of the Director General of Amnesty International Gianni Rufini.

“Overcoming this difference”, Ettore Fiorina saw this incarnated in the Biblical example of Rispa, the mother whose story he wanted to use to introduce the evening, a mother who decided to watch over her children and all those who died together with them, because “Every child is the son of everyone”.

The speeches were opened by Fabrizio Annaro, director of the Dialogue of Monza, the online newspaper who decided to put the ‘good news’ as hedlines on the front page: In his speech he underlined that a GOOD NEWS makes the same imperceptible noise of A FOREST THAT GROWS; “The growing forest is the actions of men of good will who exist and act. And that we can all be in our everyday life. We will perhaps never be a majority, but as that ‘minority of the righteous’ mentioned in the Talmud we will have the strength to lead the whole world. ”

Carlo Chierico first recalled that all the activity of the UPF was inspired by the founders, Dr. Rev. Sun Myung Moon and his wife Dr. Hak Ja Han, citing in particular the activity in favor of peace and human rights developed with great commitment at the world level, and then introduced the Togolese journalist Kokouvi Aligbo, forced to seek political asylum for writing articles not welcome by the president of his country. From his words we discover the existence of a dictatorship that exerts absolute control over the economic resources and freedom of people, despite the fact that Togo is a very rich country.

The second speech was by former Senator Albertina Soliani who brought testimony of the deep friendship established with the leader of Burma Aung San Suu Kyi. She then told the story from when he was under house arrest until, with her determination and stubbornness, was elected by her people. She then went on to describe how she is continuing to take action to try to improve the situation by trying to implement the ‘spiritual revolution’ that the Burmese leader herself may accompany politics. All this not to set limitations to proclaiming human rights but choosing to live them.

The last intervention was Lorenzo Locati who chose to roll up his sleeves and do something even without being in charge in the government. Former professor of physical education and founder of the Insieme association in Monza, a non-profit organization, created to bring humanitarian aid to the territories devastated by the war in Syria and which has its own inspirational principle in its very name. Together, for the Syrian people battered by the war, in recent years, quite a lot has been done, as Lorenzo explained enthusiastically. An example above all? The Plaster School, literally ‘school patch’: “Because we do not pretend to solve the problem, but at least try to put a band-aid”. It is a school that gathers the last of the lasts: children with disabilities, or forced to work in the streets, or hardly marked by the ongoing war.

After 70 years, the principles written in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights are entrusted to us. And it is up to us to ensure that those around us can continue to read them. By continuing ourselves to write them, in our lives and in our actions. Faithful to the great duty contained in the first of the thirty principles of the Charter: “to act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood”. As human beings, “endowed with reason and conscience.

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